Tag Archives: Africa Weeks for the Animals

Africa Weeks for the Animals, Day 4: Habibu Names A Gorilla

Today we look back at the June 16th Kwita Izina Ceremony in which AoC sponsored Moise “Habibu” Habineza was given the honor of naming a gorilla. On this day, 19 mountain gorilla infants that were born in the wild since June 2011 were given Kinyarwandan names.
Habibu proceeds to the stage to name a baby gorilla at Rwanda’s Annual Kwita Izina Gorilla Naming Ceremony.

Turiho, an adult female and member of the Agashya group, had a baby on 7 August 2011. Habibu named this female baby, Iwacu – meaning ‘at home’.

Proud Habibu names his baby gorilla Iwacu.

Not only will this day remain unforgettable for Habibu and his family, the day also represents hope for the survival of the critically endangered mountain gorillas.

Habibu with musician Kidum.  Kwita Izina.  AoC 2012Habibu with musician Kidum.

Musician Kidum and his band mates performed on stage to a crowd of adoring fans during the naming ceremony. As if the day could not get any better for a teenage boy, Habibu spoke with Kidum during lunch.

Returning to his village, Habibu is surrounded by family and friends.

What a remarkable experience for Habibu! Thank you Volcanoes National Park and RDB for bestowing this honor upon him!

Art of Conservation joins Animal World USA-International in its 3rd Africa Weeks for the Animals. Throughout this celebration, we will be featuring an inside look at our conservation and health lessons taught in Rwanda by the AoC team focusing on the protection of the critically endangered mountain gorilla. Mountain gorilla habitat consists of two small areas in Africa- The Virunga Massif and Bwindi Impenetrable National Park. With only approximately 786 mountain gorillas left in the world, I hope you will agree that intense effort must continue to be made for this species survival. AoC’s role in gorilla protection involves working with rural communities which surround gorilla habitat. Please click here for more on AWUSA-International Africa Weeks.

Please consider supporting Art of Conservation today by clicking here. Thank you very much!

Africa Weeks for the Animals, Day 3: Heroes of the Forest

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2012 AoC students practice and perform Heroes of the Forest.

Art of Conservation joins Animal World USA-International in its 3rd Africa Weeks for the Animals. Throughout this celebration, we will be featuring an inside look at our conservation and health lessons taught in Rwanda by the AoC team focusing on the protection of the critically endangered mountain gorilla. Mountain gorilla habitat consists of two small areas in Africa- The Virunga Massif and Bwindi Impenetrable National Park. With only approximately 786 mountain gorillas left in the world, I hope you will agree that intense effort must continue to be made for this species survival. AoC’s role in gorilla protection involves working with rural communities which surround gorilla habitat. Please click here for more on AWUSA-International Africa Weeks.

Please consider supporting Art of Conservation today by clicking here. Thank you very much!

Africa Weeks for the Animals: Part 8. The Organic View Radio Show

Well I hope you have enjoyed viewing our activities which our students participated in to help Animal World USA-International’s 2nd Annual Africa Weeks for the Animals.  I know that the AoC team and I have loved working with our students during our in-depth mountain gorilla study.

June Stoyer, the host of The Organic View, interviewed AWUSA-International president Michelle Buchalew and me recently and here is that conversation.
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Listen to internet radio with The Organic View on Blog Talk Radio

Please visit Animal World’s site here to see how you can get more involved in their exceptional efforts.

Africa Weeks For The Animals: Part 7. Time To Go To Bed

We begin wrapping up our in-depth study of mountain gorillas by learning how gorillas prepare for bed each night. These primates make new night nests in a new location on the forest floor and aren’t necesssarily bunk mates with any of their fellow family members – besides a mother with her infant baby.
Building mountain gorilla night nests.  Art of Conservation 2011Using sheets bought from the local market instead of herbaceous foliage and tree branches, our students grab their nest building material.

Where and how do mountain gorillas sleep at night? AoC2011The top silverback of the group is usually found in the middle with his family members surrounding him.

Students pretending to be mountain gorillas and building night nests. AoC 2011Two of our students pretend to be a mama and baby gorilla sharing their night nest.

After sleeping for the night in their nests, gorillas head out for the day.  AoC 2011.The sun is rising and our gorilla family slowly moves on from their beds to begin a day of eating, relaxing, grooming, and more eating. Oh to be a gorilla!

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Art of Conservation joins Animal World USA-International in its 2nd Africa Weeks for the Animals beginning 1 August 2011! Throughout this week, we will be featuring an inside look at our conservation and health lessons taught in Rwanda by the AoC team which focus on the protection of the critically endangered mountain gorilla. Mountain gorilla habitat consists of two small areas in Africa- The Virunga Massif and Bwindi Impenetrable National Park. With only 786 mountain gorillas left in the world, I hope you will agree that intense effort must continue to be made for this species survival. AoC’s role in gorilla protection involves working with rural communities which surround gorilla habitat. Please click here for more on AWUSA-International Weeks campaign.

Africa Weeks For The Animals: Part 6. A Tribute to Dian Fossey & Her Gorillas

All of us here at Art of Conservation continue joining Animal World USA-International in its 2nd Africa Weeks for the Animals. We are featuring an inside look at our conservation and health lessons taught in Rwanda by the AoC team focusing on the protection of the critically endangered mountain gorilla. Mountain gorilla habitat consists of two small areas in Africa- The Virunga Massif and Bwindi Impenetrable National Park. With only 786 mountain gorillas left in the world, I hope you will agree that intense effort must continue to be made for this species survival. AoC’s role in gorilla protection involves working with rural communities which surround gorilla habitat. Today’s focus… Dian Fossey.

Dian Fossey was born in the USA in 1932. In 1966 she began her pioneering mountain gorilla research at Kabara Meadow, Democratic Republic of Congo. Dian stayed at Kabara Meadow only a short time due to civil unrest and moved to the Rwanda side of The Virunga Massif. She established her Karisoke Research Centre in 1967 between Mt. Bisoke and Mt. Karisimbi until her murder in 1985.

Alliance studying mountain gorillas and Dian Fossey. Art of Conservation 2011Alliance shows us her painting of Dian Fossey as she imagines Dian would be in the forest studying her beloved mountain gorillas.

Children's paintings of Dian Fossey studying mountain gorillas. Art of Conservation 2011A student’s painting of Dian Fossey in the forest as she sits on a fallen tree observing playing juvenile mountain gorillas.

Children's paintings of Dian Fossey studying mountain gorillas. Art of Conservation 2011Student’s paintings.

Children painting.  Art of Conservation 2011.In the classroom.

Children's paintings of Dian Fossey studying mountain gorillas. Art of Conservation 2011A picture by a student of how we imagine Dian Fossey to have been observing gorillas.

Children's paintings of Dian Fossey studying mountain gorillas. Art of Conservation 2011More fantastic pictures by the children.

Children painting. Art of Conservation 2011Beautiful kids in the classroom.

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Art of Conservation joins Animal World USA-International in its 2nd Africa Weeks for the Animals beginning 1 August 2011! Throughout this week, we will be featuring an inside look at our conservation and health lessons taught in Rwanda by the AoC team which focus on the protection of the critically endangered mountain gorilla. Mountain gorilla habitat consists of two small areas in Africa- The Virunga Massif and Bwindi Impenetrable National Park. With only 786 mountain gorillas left in the world, I hope you will agree that intense effort must continue to be made for this species survival. AoC’s role in gorilla protection involves working with rural communities which surround gorilla habitat. Please click here for more on AWUSA-International Weeks campaign.

Africa Weeks For The Animals: Part 5. Playing Juveniles

Just as the chalkboard below shows, mountain gorillas are called juveniles when they are between the ages of 4 to 7. These formative years for the youngsters are filled with fun. Wrestling, climbing, exploring, mutual grooming, and more wrestling take up most of the day. When they get a bit too unruly, the leader of the family sends a stern look coupled with a grunt.
Studying mountain gorillas. Art of Conservation 2011Studying juvenile mountain gorillas.

Studying mountain gorillas. Art of Conservation 2011Children looking at visuals.

Mountain Gorillas playing. Art of Conservation 2011Fun times in the forest.

Mountain gorillas playing.  Art of Conservation 2011More fun times in the forest.

Volcanoes National Park in Rwanda. AoC 2011The silverback is never too far away from his family members.

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Art of Conservation joins Animal World USA-International in its 2nd Africa Weeks for the Animals beginning 1 August 2011! Throughout this week, we will be featuring an inside look at our conservation and health lessons taught in Rwanda by the AoC team which focus on the protection of the critically endangered mountain gorilla. Mountain gorilla habitat consists of two small areas in Africa- The Virunga Massif and Bwindi Impenetrable National Park. With only 786 mountain gorillas left in the world, I hope you will agree that intense effort must continue to be made for this species survival. AoC’s role in gorilla protection involves working with rural communities which surround gorilla habitat. Please click here for more on AWUSA-International Weeks campaign.

Africa Weeks For The Animals: Part 4. A Mama and Her Baby

Baby or infant mountain gorillas are 0 – 3 years old. Weaning occurs around 3 years of age. An adult female gorilla is able to have a baby from the age of 7. She is pregnant for 9 months-just like people.
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Video. A Mama and Her Baby

A newborn gorilla weighs about 1.8 kg (4 lb), and spends it first few month in constant physical contact with its mother. A baby’s favorite mode of transportation is on its mother’s back.

Drawings from children in Art of Conservation. Rwanda 2011.Our student’s pictures of a mama and her baby.

A Mama and Her Baby in Volcanoes National Park in Rwanda.  Art of Conservation 2011.A baby mountain gorilla clinging closely to its mama in Volcanoes National Park in Rwanda.

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Art of Conservation joins Animal World USA-International in its 2nd Africa Weeks for the Animals beginning 1 August 2011! Throughout this week, we will be featuring an inside look at our conservation and health lessons taught in Rwanda by the AoC team which focus on the protection of the critically endangered mountain gorilla. Mountain gorilla habitat consists of two small areas in Africa- The Virunga Massif and Bwindi Impenetrable National Park. With only 786 mountain gorillas left in the world, I hope you will agree that intense effort must continue to be made for this species survival. AoC’s role in gorilla protection involves working with rural communities which surround gorilla habitat. Please click here for more on AWUSA-International Weeks campaign.

Africa Weeks For The Animals: Part 3. More Silverbacks!

Silverbacks, the top dog of a mountain gorilla family, continue to be the focal point of discussion. Children learn about a silverback’s role including the fact that there may be more than one silverback per family.

Silverbacks.  Art of Conservation 2011.After discussion and viewing visuals children draw silverbacks.

Silverback watercolor on green.  Art of Conservation 2011.A watercolor of a silverback mountain gorilla from one of our conservation and health education students.

AoC student Phocas painting silverback mountain gorillas.  Art of Conservation 2011Phocas creates a silverback on paper. Rushubi Primary School.

Silverback watercolor.  Art of Conservation 2011Phocas’s painting.

In the classroom.  Art of Conservation 2011Eusebe leads the art exercise.

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Art of Conservation joins Animal World USA-International in its 2nd Africa Weeks for the Animals beginning 1 August 2011! Throughout this week, we will be featuring an inside look at our conservation and health lessons taught in Rwanda by the AoC team which focus on the protection of the critically endangered mountain gorilla. Mountain gorilla habitat consists of two small areas in Africa- The Virunga Massif and Bwindi Impenetrable National Park. With only 786 mountain gorillas left in the world, I hope you will agree that intense effort must continue to be made for this species survival. AoC’s role in gorilla protection involves working with rural communities which surround gorilla habitat. Please click here for more on AWUSA-International Weeks campaign at http://www.animalworldusa.org/

Africa Weeks For The Animals: Part 2. The Art of the Silverback Mountain Gorilla

It’s safe to say that all gorillas are critically endangered despite some numbers that are hard to make due to political instability. We turn our student’s attention toward the mountain gorillas which reside in our neck of the woods and we begin to dissect the different members of a gorilla family or group. We start with the chief of the family, the silverback. Please find below a snapshot of our silverback learning beginning with a short video followed by a sample of our children’s oil crayon resist painting exercise of a bipedal silverback.

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Video. The Art of the Silverback Mountain Gorilla by Art of Conservation students in Rwanda

Bipedal Silverback Mountain Gorillas.  Art of Conservation (c) 2011.Bipedal silverback oil crayon and watercolor resist drawing, no. 1.

Bipedal Silverback Mountain Gorillas.  Art of Conservation (c) 2011.Bipedal silverback oil crayon and watercolor resist drawing, no. 2.

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Art of Conservation joins Animal World USA-International in its 2nd Africa Weeks for the Animals beginning 1 August 2011! Throughout this week, we will be featuring an inside look at our conservation and health lessons taught in Rwanda by the AoC team which focus on the protection of the critically endangered mountain gorilla. Mountain gorilla habitat consists of two small areas in Africa- The Virunga Massif and Bwindi Impenetrable National Park. With only 786 mountain gorillas left in the world, I hope you will agree that intense effort must continue to be made for this species survival. AoC’s role in gorilla protection involves working with rural communities which surround gorilla habitat.

Africa Weeks For the Animals: Part 1. Genus:GORILLA Status:CRITICALLY ENDANGERED

Art of Conservation begins an in-depth look at mountain gorillas by sharing with the children their classification.

AoC student Jean Didas shows how the gorilla species and sub-species looks.  Rushubi School 2011.Jean Didas, a conservation and health education student, studies the classification of gorillas at Rushubi Primary School.

This is how it looks…
Genus: Gorilla (Gorilla)
Species: Western Gorilla (Gorilla gorilla)

  • Subspecies: Western Lowland Gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) fewer than 200,000.
  • Subspecies: Cross River Gorilla (Gorilla gorilla diehli) fewer than 300 and the most endangered kind of gorilla.

Species: Eastern Gorilla (Gorilla beringei)

  • Subspecies: Eastern Lowland Gorilla (Gorilla beringei graueri) fewer than 5,000.
  • Subspecies: Mountain Gorilla (Gorilla beringei beringei) 786.

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Art of Conservation joins Animal World USA-International in its 2nd Africa Weeks for the Animals beginning 1 August 2011! Throughout this week, we will be featuring an inside look at our conservation and health lessons taught in Rwanda by the AoC team which focus on the protection of the critically endangered mountain gorilla. Mountain gorilla habitat consists of two small areas in Africa- The Virunga Massif and Bwindi Impenetrable National Park. With only 786 mountain gorillas left in the world, I hope you will agree that intense effort must continue to be made for this species survival. AoC’s role in gorilla protection involves working with rural communities which surround gorilla habitat. Please click here for more on AWUSA-International Weeks campaign at http://www.animalworldusa.org/